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HOW TO WIN OVER CHINA'S E-COMMERCE

Aruba, September 16, 2013 - When was the last time you adjusted your business strategy based on China's changing consumer behavior?

With economic growth, comes consumer maturity. China's emerging consumers are becoming more independent, confident and connected. Like all of us, China's consumers are changing not only demographically and geographically, they are adjusting to choice. Lots of choice. Much of that choice is emerging in the world of e-commerce.

There are nearly 600 million netizens in China and they are beginning to aggressively shop online. The challenge for online commerce outlets is to define just who their customers are and how they make their purchase decisions. In other words, what influences them to spend money online?

What we do know is that men shop differently than women, even when it comes to online purchases. For example, we know that men tend to be more, let's call it, goal oriented when they shop online. But they also tend to buy things specifically for themselves. That said, both sexes are looking for two key things: lower prices and greater convenience.

Nielsen's 2012 annual report on online shopping behaviors of Chinese consumers showed that for a couple of key categories covered in the survey, men were more active than women in online shopping. Eighty percent of male respondents, (vs. 59% of female respondents) went online for consumer electronics purchases, while 71% of male respondents, (vs. 66% of female respondents) went online to purchase services.

With more people shopping on the Internet, we are also seeing online shoppers increasingly becoming impatient as they shop. If they can't easily find what they want, they quickly move on. They want to shop on their terms and their timelines. So, how do we ensure online shopping is embedded in the broader Internet experience for China's online consumers?

According to the survey, 66% of connected consumers were both microblog and social networking site users. The implication for brands would be to use their microblog presence as information delivery centers to combine and bring together all other digital platforms such as a company website, campaign mini-site, social networking brand page and viral video content.

With the high penetration of smart phones, e-commerce evolves a step further to m-commerce. We can see that consumers aren't even waiting to get back home to switch on their computers and start spending. Consumers want to browse and shop whenever they want -- on the subway, while waiting for friends, or even during meal times. Engaging with mobile users is critical in this and most other markets.

Read more/ Source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/15/business/on-china-e-commerce/index.html?hpt=ibu_c2

 

By orbitalnets.com